Dedrone’s DroneTracker is equipped with various sensors and intelligent pattern recognition software. Once a drone has been identified, the jammer is activated via an interface and transmits electromagnetic waves which interfere with the radio signal between remote control unit and drone. If a drone is flying on automatic pilot, the GPS signals required for navigation can also be jammed. In both cases, the effect is the same: the drones are disoriented and the manufacturer’s pre-programmed safety procedure generally cuts in, meaning that the drone flies back to where it started from, lands immediately, or remains hovering in mid-air. 
“In general, remote-controlled drones only operate in a certain frequency range”, explains Alexander F. Wuest, CEO of HP. “Our jammer is configured to specifically target the drone’s frequency range and stop it without causing any damage.”
Not every organization is permitted to use jammers, because there is a risk of them interfering with other radio and Wi-Fi connections in the vicinity. “Use of the jammer is therefore reserved primarily for the protection of government installations, major event venues and prisons against drone attacks,” explains Lamprecht.
Depending on requirements, other third-party products such as warning lights, smoke grenades, automatic roller blinds or sirens can also be integrated into the DroneTracker platform via enhanced API access.

A nice little video can be found here

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